For these processes consist largely in the acquisition of impersonal ideas which obscure what we really are and feel, what we really want, and what really excites our interest. Coleridge for the comparison of poetic prose to the second-hand finery of a lady’s maid (just made use of). III.–OF THE DIFFERENT SYSTEMS WHICH HAVE BEEN…

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She has, it is true, none of the vices of the French theatre, its extravagance, its flutter, its grimace, and affectation, but her merit in these respects is as it were negative, and she seems to put an artificial restraint upon herself. It could, as we have seen (p. We trust the man, who seems…

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Under the boisterous and stormy sky of war and faction, of public tumult and confusion, the sturdy severity of self-command prospers the most, and can be the most successfully cultivated. And this would be the case if our sensations were simple and detached, and one had no influence on another. After a vain effort to…

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Mill, “Utilitarianism.” [32] The idea of God personified is often used as standing for a symbol or norm of ideal conduct, bearing an affinity to the ideal self or ego. Among the heathen Northmen, as we have seen, every pleader, whether plaintiff or defendant, was obliged to take a preliminary oath on the sacred _stalla…

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I am aware that this is a dangerous suggestion to make. Augustine to Tomaka, one mound which must have covered two acres of ground,”[74] but this must surely have been a communal burial mound. _’Tis pretty, though a plague_, to sit and peep into the pit of Tophet, to play at _snap-dragon_ with flames and…

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The stranger replied, “I am here gathering in that which I sent.” Resting from his work, he drew from his pocket an immense cigar, and, taking out a flint and steel, began to strike a light. This view of the matter was taken by a majority of the New York Booksellers’ League at a recent…

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Fig. The ancient line of division between the superior man and his inferior spouse has been half effaced by the admission of women into the higher culture circle. In the punishment of treason, the sovereign resents the injuries which are immediately done to himself: in the punishment of other crimes he resents those which are…

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If, on the contrary, the bad player notwithstanding all his blunders, should, in the same manner, happen to win, his success can give him but little satisfaction. It is this spirit, however, which, while it has reserved the celestial regions for monks and friars, or for those whose conduct and conversation resembled those of monks…

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The conclusions to which the above facts tend are as follows: 1. This is also called _hun uallah_, one time the stature or height of a man, from a root meaning “to draw to a point,” “to finish off.” The Spanish writers say that one _uallah_ was equal to about three _varas_, and was used…

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We answer, in the preliminary stage of our existence. It is always mortifying not to be believed, and it is doubly so when we suspect that it is because we are supposed to be unworthy of belief and capable of seriously and wilfully deceiving. In 1080 the Synod of Lillebonne adopted a canon punishing by…

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